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Annual Competition Results

The Arthritis Society’s research investments

The Arthritis Society funds only the best, most scientifically meritorious research proposals that offer the greatest hope for improvements in our ability to diagnose, prevent, treat, repair and lead to a cure for arthritis. 

In 2017-18, the Arthritis Society has committed $2.1 million to arthritis research and the development of researchers and clinicians.

Annual Competition Results

  • Dr. Tom Appleton, Western University

    Assistant Professor, Dept. of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University 

    Project Title: The dual role of synovial macrophages in post-traumatic and metabolic osteoarthritis.

    Keywords: osteoarthritis, synovitis, articular cartilage, macrophage, inflammation, animal models of OA, early arthritis, flow cytometry, metabolic OA, post-traumatic OA

    Project Summary:

    • Why?: OA is different from other types of arthritis with high-grade inflammation (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis). OA presents with low-grade, chronic, and often intermittent inflammation. Research has shown that inflammation in the lining of joints from people and animals with OA contains high numbers of immune cells called macrophages.
    • What?: This project proposes to answer these questions: 
      1. Are OA macrophages mainly pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory, and are they different in early vs. late stages, and in post-traumatic OA vs. metabolic OA?
      2. What are the gene expression profiles of OA macrophages in different stages and types of OA?
      3. Does treatment that specifically causes loss of macrophages reduce or accelerate OA, and does the effect depend on treatment timing or type of OA?
    • How?: Use two animal models of post-traumatic OA to examine the knee joint tissues to assess whether the macrophages present in early and late knee OA are mostly pro-inflammatory vs. anti-inflammatory, and whether the macrophages occurring in each type of OA are different.

      Use advanced genetic tools to measure the expression of all macrophage genes, which will give us critical insight into how these cells are functioning at different stages of each type of OA.

      Use a treatment to selectively remove all macrophages from the rats while OA develops, or after OA has been established.
    • Impact?: To help us understand if macrophages worsen or protect against knee OA, and whether these cells behave differently in early and late OA of different types.

      If a treatment is developed, the knowledge gained from these critical experiments may help us personalize how, when, and in which types of patients a macrophage targeting treatment might work best.

      To prepare us to test how we could strategically leverage the anti-inflammatory functions of macrophages in future studies to improve OA outcomes.

    Project Lay Summary:

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is by far the most common type of arthritis. Many people think OA is just “wear and tear” arthritis and don’t know that OA also involves inflammation. Importantly, OA is different from other types of arthritis with high-grade inflammation (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis). OA presents with low-grade, chronic, and often intermittent inflammation. Research has shown that inflammation in the lining of joints from people and animals with OA contains high numbers of immune cells called macrophages.

    In this study, we will test whether macrophages play a critical role in the development and progression of two types of OA seen very commonly in people: OA after joint injury (post-traumatic OA), and OA with changes in the body’s metabolism such as obesity (metabolic OA). Interestingly, some macrophages promote inflammation while others help to control inflammation and promote tissue healing. However, a critical knowledge gap exists. It is unknown whether the main roles of macrophages are affected by different stages or different types of OA.

    This project proposes to answer these questions: 1. Are OA macrophages mainly pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory, and are they different in early vs. late stages, and in post-traumatic OA vs. metabolic OA? 2. What are the gene expression profiles of OA macrophages in different stages and types of OA? 3. Does treatment that specifically causes loss of macrophages reduce or accelerate OA, and does the effect depend on treatment timing or type of OA?

    Before we can safely answer these questions in humans, we need to acquire more information about the role of macrophages in OA by using two well-established animal models of post-traumatic OA and metabolic OA in rats. First, we will examine the knee joint tissues to assess whether the macrophages present in early and late knee OA are mostly pro-inflammatory vs. anti-inflammatory. We will also see whether the macrophages occurring in each type of OA are different.

    Next, we will use advanced genetic tools to measure the expression of all macrophage genes, which will give us critical insight into how these cells are functioning at different stages of each type of OA. Finally, we will use a treatment to selectively remove all macrophages from the rats while OA develops, or after OA has been established. Comparing the severity of OA with and without macrophages, at different stages of the disease, and in different types of OA, will give us critical knowledge about these inflammatory cells. Our long-term goal is to find treatments for the symptoms and damage caused by OA in our patients.

    This project will help us understand if macrophages worsen or protect against knee OA, and whether these cells behave differently in early and late OA of different types. If a treatment is developed, the knowledge gained from these critical experiments may help us personalize how, when, and in which types of patients a macrophage targeting treatment might work best. The study will also prepare us well to test how we could strategically leverage the anti-inflammatory functions of macrophages in future studies to improve OA outcomes.

  • Dr. Andrew Leask, Western University

    Associate Professor, Dept. of Dentistry, Schulich Medicine & Dentistry, Western University

    Project Title: YAP1: a novel target for scleroderma fibrosis?

    Keywords: Scleoderma, conditional, fibrosis, adhesive signaling, connective tissue, skin, cell culture, fibroblast, TGF beta, microenvironment

    Project summary:

    • Why?: The most characteristic feature of scleroderma is the build-up of tough scar-like fibrous tissue in the skin. A cell type called the myofibroblast (a special form of fibroblast) is responsible for the overproduction of collagen and the development of tough scar tissue (a process called called fibrosis).  The toughness of the scar tissue itself in turn acts on myofibroblasts to generate more collagen and scar tissue.  We want to break this vicious cycle to treat scleroderma.
    • What?: The aim of our project is to identify if a protein called YAP1 (found inside the fibroblast) is responsible for generating the toughness of scar tissue.
    • How?: To test if:
      1. Visudyne can block the generation and activity of myofibroblasts, and
      2. The presence of YAP1 in fibroblasts is essential for the development of skin fibrosis in our animal models of scleroderma.
    • Impact?: Our project could ultimately result in the use of these drugs to treat scleroderma.

    Project lay summary:

    Need/Gap addressed: According to The Arthritis Society's website: "the name scleroderma is derived from the Greek word skleros, which means hard, and derma, which means skin. The most characteristic feature of scleroderma is the build-up of tough scar-like fibrous tissue in the skin. The disease may affect the skin alone...or be a systemic disease that involves internal organs...Scleroderma begins with being born with the genetic potential to develop the disease. Something then triggers the immune system....to generate antibodies that attack healthy tissue.... This response produces inflammation and an overproduction of collagen " the tough fibrous protein that helps construct connective tissues, such as tendons, bones, and ligaments (and) scar tissue. This excess collagen is deposited in the skin and body organs." A cell type called the myofibroblast (a special form of fibroblast) is responsible for the overproduction of collagen and the development of tough scar tissue (a process called called fibrosis). The toughness of the scar tissue itself in turn acts on myofibroblasts to generate more collagen and scar tissue. We want to break this vicious cycle to treat scleroderma.

    Research Question and Approach: The aim of our project is to identify if a protein called YAP1 (found inside the fibroblast) is responsible for generating the toughness of scar tissue. YAP1 is activated due to the acquisition of tough connective tissue and has increases levels of a gene called CCN2 that is essential for the development of scar tissue. Since drugs targeting YAP1 (e.g. Visudyne) have been in clinical use since the year 2000, they are safe to use in humans. Our project could ultimately result in the use of these drugs to treat scleroderma. In this project, we will test if:1) Visudyne can block the generation and activity of myofibroblasts, and 2) the presence of YAP1 in fibroblasts is essential for the development of skin fibrosis in our animal models of scleroderma.

    Impact: We will: 1) Show if YAP1 inhibitors block the activity of myofibroblasts 2) Show if YAP1 is required for skin fibrosis 3) Provide evidence whether, in principle, YAP inhibitors could be used to treat scleroderma.

  • Dr. Jason McDougall, Dalhousie University

    Professor, Departments of Pharmacology & Anaesthesia, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University

    Project Title: Sex Differences in Joint Neuropathic Pain Involve NaV1.8 Ion Channels

    Keywords: neuropathic pain, osteoarthritis, electrophysiology, pain behaviour, animal models, sodium channels, joint nerves, drug discovery, gender, immunohistochemistry

    Project Summary:

    • Why?: Emerging evidence shows that nerves in OA joints are damaged leading to the development of neuropathic pain, while drugs like Advil© (ibuprofen) are being used which treat inflammatory pain. Therefore, a new family of drugs which manage neuropathic pain are required. A promising target for the alleviation of neuropathic pain is a sodium channel present exclusively on pain-sensing nerves. These sodium channels are responsible for the electrical activity and resultant firing of pain-sensing nerves only.
    • What?: A neuronal channel called NaV1.8 has been implicated in neuropathic pain and we have previously found that blocking this channel can alleviate OA pain. Joint neuropathic pain is mediated in part by NaV1.8 channels in a sex-specific manner.
    • How?: Joint nerve damage and neuropathic pain will be compared between male and female animals with knee OA. Animals will then be treated with a NaV1.8 inhibitor to see if there is a sex-specific difference in pain relief when blocking this nerve channel. Finally, we will develop a NaV1.8 antibody system which will be more effective at blocking this sodium channel and thereby prolong the analgesic window. 
    • Impact?: To identify a novel treatment strategy for the alleviation of OA pain for patients who are unresponsive to the currently prescribed anti-inflammatory drugs. While this treatment would be suitable for both sexes, we predict that females will benefit more from this approach than males.

    Project Lay Summary:

    The number one concern of osteoarthritis (OA) patients is effective pain relief; however, this primary consumer need is often unmet. One of the reasons for this lack of effective OA pain control is that currently prescribed analgesics are treating the wrong type of pain. Emerging evidence shows that nerves in OA joints are damaged leading to the development of neuropathic pain, while drugs like Advil© (ibuprofen) are being used which treat inflammatory pain. Therefore, a new family of drugs which manage neuropathic pain are required.

    A promising target for the alleviation of neuropathic pain is a sodium channel present exclusively on pain-sensing nerves. These sodium channels are responsible for the electrical activity and resultant firing of pain-sensing nerves only. Thus, targeting these neuronal channels will reduce the nerve activity associated with neuropathic pain while maintaining normal sensitivity to touch and temperature.

    One such channel, called NaV1.8, has been implicated in neuropathic pain and we have previously found that blocking this channel can alleviate OA pain. A limitation of the blocker, however, is that its pain-relieving effects are short lasting. Women are more likely to suffer from OA and experience more musculoskeletal pain compared to men. The reasons for this sex distinction are unknown, but differences in neurobiology is likely to play a major part. Neuropathic pain is more common in females and this is because females are more susceptible to peripheral nerve damage.

    We believe this sex difference in neuropathic pain sensitivity is linked to variations in NaV1.8 levels. Thus, we hypothesize that: Joint neuropathic pain is mediated in part by NaV1.8 channels in a sex-specific manner. Joint nerve damage and neuropathic pain will be compared between male and female animals with knee OA. Animals will then be treated with a NaV1.8 inhibitor to see if there is a sex-specific difference in pain relief when blocking this nerve channel.

    Finally, we will develop a NaV1.8 antibody system which will be more effective at blocking this sodium channel and thereby prolong the analgesic window. Our proposed studies will identify a novel treatment strategy for the alleviation of OA pain for patients who are unresponsive to the currently prescribed anti-inflammatory drugs. While this treatment would be suitable for both sexes, we predict that females will benefit more from this approach than males.

  • Dr. Alan Rosenberg, University of Saskatchewan

    Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan

    Project title: The Biologic Basis of Co-existent Uveitis and Arthritis in Children: Towards Early Detection, Targeted Treatment, and Prevention

    Keywords: antinuclear, arthritis, autoimmunity, childhood arthritis, collagen, inflammation, JIA, matrix metalloproteinase, streptocouccus, uveitis

    Project Summary:

    • Why?: An estimated 24,000 Canadian children live with arthritis.  One in eight children with JIA (an estimated 3,000 Canadian children) also will have uveitis, which is inflammation of the middle layer of the eyes.  The reasons why joint inflammation (arthritis) and eye inflammation (uveitis) occur together in some children are poorly understood. 
    • What?: To help explain why joint and eye inflammation occur together in children.
    • How?: To investigate how collagen structure is changed by certain inflammation proteins, by studying a larger group of children with arthritis and over time see if testing their blood for the same markers can be used to predict who will develop uveitis. 
    • Impact?: Early recognition of uveitis in children with arthritis and prompt treatment are essential to prevent blindness. By determining the mechanisms that explain the link between arthritis and uveitis in children, we can then design more specific treatments and gain insight into possible causes of the condition.

    Project Lay Summary:

    An estimated 24,000 Canadian children live with arthritis.  One in eight children with JIA (an estimated 3,000 Canadian children) also will have uveitis, which is inflammation of the middle layer of the eyes. Despite intensive and often distressing therapies (for example, administration of eye drops to young children many times a day), up to one-third of affected children develop profound, permanent vision loss.  As a young adult who has endured childhood onset arthritis and uveitis stated: “Arthritis and uveitis are independently life altering; together they can have devastating consequences.  Lack of mobility or loss of sight can quickly strip the innocence of childhood.”

    Uveitis is usually invisible to the patient until it causes eye damage. It can lead to permanent vision loss in one third of affected children. Early recognition of uveitis in children with arthritis and prompt treatment are essential to prevent blindness.

    The reasons why joint inflammation (arthritis) and eye inflammation (uveitis) occur together in some children are poorly understood. We expect this research will help explain why  joint and eye inflammation occur together in children.  In our earlier studies of animals with joint and eye inflammation we identified collagen (a protein that is present in both the joint and the eye) as a  possible common target that is attacked by the immune system of affected children.

    In this research project, we will investigate how collagen structure is changed by certain inflammation proteins. Once altered, the collagen causes an immune reaction that leads to damage in the joint and the eye.   In our prior studies in animals and in children affected with arthritis and uveitis we identified markers in the blood that are present when these two conditions occur together. Using this information we are now prepared to study a larger group of children with arthritis and over time see if testing their blood for the same markers can be used to predict who will develop uveitis.

    By determining the mechanisms that explain the link between arthritis and uveitis in children, we can then design more specific treatments and gain insight into possible causes of the condition. For example, it is possible that certain infections could trigger the start of the inflammation in the joint and eye in children who have certain genetic characteristics.

    This study will be conducted in childhood arthritis clinics across Canada.  We will collaborate with Canadian ophthalmologists and other researchers from the United States and the Netherlands to ensure this study is undertaken quickly and efficiently to generate results that can be promptly applied to benefit affected children. 

  • Dr. Bruno da Costa, University of Toronto

    Assistant Professor, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

    Project title: Personalization of osteoarthritis care using large-scale randomized evidence: network meta-analysis and methodological development

    Keywords: osteoarthritis, treatment, pain, meta-analysis, randomized, evidence-based, quality of life, systematic review, knee, hip

    Project summary:

    • Why?: There are many treatments for osteoarthritis available, but the most effective and safest treatments are not known yet.
    • What?: Our objective is to determine what treatments work best for patients with osteoarthritis.
    • How?
      1. We will collect and critically evaluate all pertinent published trials over the last 30 years. We will employ sophisticated statistical techniques that are capable of estimating the benefits and harms of each treatment compared against each other, even if few or no head-to-head comparisons have been conducted.
      2. We will develop a statistical model that will allow us to investigate the association between treatment effects of each conservative OA treatment and personal characteristics of people living with OA. This analysis will allow us to tailor the treatment of people living with OA according to their personal characteristics.
      3. We will implement a freely available online platform to provide patients and clinicians access to the results of our analyses to facilitate shared clinical decision-making. This platform will use the characteristics of people with osteoarthritis (e.g. age, gender, disease severity) to inform users about the probability that each osteoarthritis treatment will cause more benefit than harm.
    • Impact?: The present project will develop and use novel methods to produce continuously updated knowledge to optimize the treatment of millions of persons living with osteoarthritis in Canada and worldwide.

    Project lay summary:

    There are many treatments for osteoarthritis available, but the most effective and safest treatments are not known yet.  In this project, our objective is to determine what treatments work best for patients with osteoarthritis.

    To accomplish this goal, we will collect and critically evaluate all pertinent published trials over the last 30 years. We will employ sophisticated statistical techniques that are capable of estimating the benefits and harms of each treatment compared against each other, even if few or no head-to-head comparisons have been conducted.

    Furthermore, we will develop novel statistical models that enable the assessment of whether patient characteristics such as age, gender, disease severity, among others, are associated with a better response to different osteoarthritis interventions. Finally, we will implement a freely available online platform to provide patients and clinicians access to the results of our analyses to facilitate shared clinical decision-making.

    This platform will use the characteristics of people with osteoarthritis (e.g. age, gender, disease severity) to inform users about the probability that each osteoarthritis treatment will cause more benefit than harm. As a whole, the present project will develop and use novel methods to produce continuously updated knowledge to optimize the treatment of millions of persons living with osteoarthritis in Canada and worldwide.

  • Dr. Arif Jetha, Institute for Work & Health

    Associate Scientist, Institute for Work & Health

    Project title: Work disability prevention for Millennial young adults with rheumatic disease

    Keywords: employment, work disability, rheumatic disease, young adulthood, job accommodations, workplace supports, longitudinal research, productivity loss, millennial, school-to-work

    Project summary:

    • Why?: Despite advances in clinical care, people living with rheumatic disease (RD) continue to report trouble finding employment and staying productive at work. Because previous research focuses primarily on older adults with RD, it is unclear if Millennial young adults with RD, who are just beginning their careers, have the same needs when it comes to workplace support.
    • What?: To examine the needs of Millennials with RD within the workplace.
    • How?: Survey Millennial young adults with RD to learn more about their workplace support needs.
    • Impact?: Results will help employers, clinicians, and policy makers develop strategies that will assist Millennials with RD transition into the world of work, and ensure that they remain employed and productive once there.

    Project lay summary:

    Despite advances in clinical care, people living with rheumatic disease (RD) continue to report trouble finding employment and staying productive at work. Some previous research suggests that workplace policies and practices play an important role in overcoming these challenges. The research indicates that job accommodations (e.g., modified hours), work modifications (e.g., rearranging tasks) and extended health benefits (e.g., access to drug benefits) are examples of effective strategies for helping people with RD sustain employment and remain productive.

    Because previous research focuses primarily on older adults with RD, it is unclear if Millennial young adults with RD, who are just beginning their careers, have the same needs when it comes to workplace support. Our study is one of the first to examine the needs of Millennials with RD within the workplace. Millennials (born 1982-1999) make up a growing portion of the labour force but are less likely to hold permanent full-time jobs. A RD adds to the challenges faced by Millennials as they transition into employment.

    We will survey Millennial young adults with RD to learn more about their workplace support needs. Our survey will also identify how characteristics of a person’s health and their working conditions impact workplace support needs, and early work experiences. Our results will help employers, clinicians, and policy makers develop strategies that will assist Millennials with RD transition into the world of work, and ensure that they remain employed and productive once there.

  • Dr. Jessica Widdifield, Sunnybrook Research Institute

    Scientist, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Evaluative Clinical Sciences Platform, Holland Musculoskeletal Research Program

    Project title: Enhancing the Use of Rheumatology Electronic Medical Records to Evaluate and Optimize Care and Management of Arthritis

    Keywords: electronic medical records, quality measure, quality indicator, quality of care, inflammatory, validation, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, wait times, health services

    Project summary:

    • Why?: The quality of care provided to Canadians with inflammatory arthritis (IA) is not routinely monitored in Canada, nor are patient clinical outcomes.  Electronic medical records (EMRs) used by doctors capture information relevant for the day-to-day care of their patients including medical histories and the type of healthcare patients receive.
    • What?:
      • Our primary research questions include:
        1. How complete are rheumatology EMRs?
        2. Can we accurately and efficiently identify patients with IA conditions from the complete practice data
        3. Is the data of sufficient quality to derive quality measures and support the measurement of quality of care and quality improvement efforts? Answering these questions will determine the feasibility and usefulness of using rheumatology EMRs for research and quality improvement purposes.
      • Secondly, we will also demonstrate the capabilities of using rheumatology EMRs to evaluate care and outcomes of IA patients. Some of the research questions that we will answer include:
        1. How long are patients waiting to see rheumatologists?
        2. Are there variations in wait times between rheumatologists?
        3. Which factors are associated with timely care?
    • How?: We will securely collect EMR data from rheumatologists into a central database. We will assess the quality of this data to understand how we can use the data to measure detailed aspects of care. This will allow us to analyze the data to better inform healthcare delivery to ensure it is safe, effective and efficient and that patients achieve the best possible outcomes.
    • Impact?: This project plays an essential first step to enable the measurement of quality of care to catalyze quality improvement efforts using real-world data for all patients under rheumatology care. Our results will inform continuous quality improvement including timely access to rheumatology care and treatment as well as patient outcome to ensure Canadians with IA are receiving the best possible care and achieving the best outcomes.

    Project lay summary:

    The quality of care provided to Canadians with inflammatory arthritis (IA) is not routinely monitored in Canada, nor are patient clinical outcomes.  Electronic medical records (EMRs) used by doctors capture information relevant for the day-to-day care of their patients including medical histories and the type of healthcare patients receive. This data can be anonymized and coded to protect patient privacy and confidentiality, and securely used for research and quality improvement activities.

    We will securely collect EMR data from rheumatologists into a central database. We will assess the quality of this data to understand how we can use the data to measure detailed aspects of care. This will allow us to analyze the data to better inform healthcare delivery to ensure it is safe, effective and efficient and that patients achieve the best possible outcomes. We will do this by developing methods to evaluate quality of care using the EMR data.  We will feedback this information to rheumatologists to help drive quality improvements. We will also evaluate wait times between rheumatologists and the effect of different models of care on  wait times.

    This project plays an essential first step to enable the measurement of quality of care to catalyze quality improvement efforts using real-world data for all patients under rheumatology care. Our results will inform continuous quality improvement including timely access to rheumatology care and treatment as well as patient outcome to ensure Canadians with IA are receiving the best possible care and achieving the best outcomes.

The iPeer2Peer Program for Youth with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial
Jennifer Stinson

A population-based analysis of multi-disciplinary rheumatology nursing care for people with complex musculoskeletal disorders
Mark Harrison

Empowering active self-management of arthritis: Raising the bar with OPERAS (an On-demand Program to EmpoweR Active Self-management)
Linda Li

Technology-enabled Joint Protection to Enhance Hand Function in Osteoarthritis
Joy MacDermid

The Interplay between Joint and Tissue Mechanics in Patients with Osteoarthritis
Emily McWalter

Characterization of Modifiable Factors that Compound the Risk for Osteoarthritis after Youth Sport-Related Knee Injury
Jackie Whittaker

Investigation of the Interplay between Inflammation, Metabolic Abnormalities and Cardiovascular Risk and Development of Cardiovascular Risk Score in Psoriatic Disease
Lihi Eder

Education Outcomes of Childhood-onset Chronic Rheumatic Diseases
Lily Lim

Determining the clinical value and underlying processes associated with new measures of activity-evoked pain for people with knee OA
Timothy Wideman

Bridging the Evidence Gap: Understanding Patient and Physician Choices for Treatment in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis
Glen Hazlewood

Aerobic Exercise for Knee Osteoarthritis Derived from Biomechanics & Quantitative MRI
Anthony Gatti

Investigating the relationship between comorbid anxiety and rheumatoid arthritis
Caitlin Blaney

Bio-inspired Design of Cartilage and Synovial Fluid
Jimmy Faivre

Lymph as vector of inflammatory mediators in rheumatoid arthritis
Nicolas Tessandier

Interaction of platelet extracellular mitochondria with neutrophils in rheumatoid arthritis
Anne Bakos

Understanding the pathogenic role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in a murine model of spondyloarthritis
Vidya Ranganathan

Improving Influenza Immunization Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Strategy To Enhance Protection Against A Preventable Cause Of Death In An At Risk Population?
Ines Colmegna

Randomized Controlled Trial of an Internet-based Exercise Program to Improve Hand Function in Patients with Scleroderma: A Scleroderma Patient-centered Intervention Network (SPIN) Study
Brett Thombs

Improving Scleroderma Patient Support Through Support Group Peer Facilitator Training: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Vanessa Delisle

High-dose intravenous immunoglobulins for first-line treatment of new onset idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: a pilot randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial
Sabrina Hoa

Properties of synthesized fluids for joint lubrication
Jimmy Faivre

Link between psoriatic arthritis and heart disease
Dr. Lihi Eder

Patient-centric approach to treatment selection for RA
Dr. Glen Hazlewood

Can immune changes help predict systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease?
Dr. Joan Wither

How deformity and activity could cause or worsen hip osteoarthritis
Dr. David Wilson

Decision support for children with arthritis and their parents regarding pain relief options
Dr. Karine Toupin-April

Reprogramming immune cells to reverse osteoarthritis
Dr. Sowmya Viswanathan

Investigating cognitive impairment in people with lupus
Dr. Zahi Touma

Power of the patient: exploring patient-centered care within multidisciplinary inflammatory arthritis teams
Dr. Laura Nimmon

Reprogramming immune cells to control inflammation and stop cartilage degradation
Alejandro Gomez-Aristizaba

Examining how physical therapists can help early intervention of osteoarthritis
Crystal MacKay

Can the healing ability of bone provide new therapies for injury-induced osteoarthritis?
Priyatha Premnath

Brain connectivity and individual factors related to TNFi pain treatment response in ankylosing spondylitis
Rachael Bosma

The role of Rac1 in the cartilage response to pathological loading
Kristyn Leitch

Can wearable sensors detect changes in joint function?
Dr. Matthew Teeter

9 biomarkers may help reveal osteoarthritis in a knee joint
Ghazaleh Tavallaee

Can we slow or stop progression of osteoarthritis by blocking a newly identified protein?
Frank Beier

Detecting cartilage damage early
Insaf Hadjab

Detecting osteoarthritis early via proteins in the blood
Guomin Ren

Exploring whether medical cannabis can mitigate OA neuropathic pain
Jason McDougall

How CD154 molecule interacts with its receptors – linked to rheumatoid arthritis
Loobna Al-Zoobi

Uncovering how lupus develops by studying platelets in immune system
Imène Melki

Preventing osteoarthritis after ACL injury
Dr. Steven Boyd

Arthritis Centres

Development and Dissemination of Ottawa Panel Clinical Practice Guidelines on Self-Management and Rehabilitation Interventions for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis
Lucie Brosseau

The Canadian Alliance of Pediatric Rheumatology Investigators (CAPRI)

What are the Risk of Depression and Its Serious Consequences in Rheumatoid Arthritis, and How is this Risk Being Managed?
Bindee Kuriya

GRADE Recommendations for the Diagnosis and Management Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Canada
Stephanie Keeling

Early diagnosis and prevention of Knee Osteoarthritis
Sara Ahmed

Registry in Arthritis in Canadian Children (ReACCh)
Dr. Lori Tucker


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